Tulsa’s Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes Event coming November 12th!

so2016_logo1

For information or registration check out: http://stepout.diabetes.org/site/TR/StepOut/StepOutContent?fr_id=11550&pg=entry

Sports Nutrition Part 3: Fuel Up

Consuming meals properly and within the appropriate time frame can decrease workout recovery time and increase muscle growth.  This post explores pre and post workout meals.

Pre Exercise.  For the casual exerciser, keep your diet practical.  I suggest eating a square meal about 4 hours before your workout.  Avoid meals that are high in fat (whole dairy products, nuts, and fried or processed foods) and fiber (fiber bars, beans, and legumes).  Exercisers should also avoid foods that are not typical to their diets as the body may not digest them well.  The goal is to keep the digestive system moving quickly to avoid gastrointestinal stress.  The ability to break down food quickly is important to nutrient absorption.

About 30 minutes before physical activity, carbs should be eaten for quick energy.  It is best if the carbs are fast digesting.  Most fruit will fall under this category.

Post Exercise.  Refueling the body is vital to the recovery process.  After exercise, your body’s cells soak up the nutrients like a sponges.  Post exercise meals should be consumed in a 4:1 ratio of carbohydrates to protein.  Don’t worry!  I made it easy for you.  Below, I listed a few snacks that fit this mold.  Meals should be consumed within 30 minutes after your workout.

1/2 whole wheat bread peanut butter sandwich

1 – 80z  glass of low-fat milk (endurance athletes drink low-fat chocolate milk)

Smoothie with low-fat milk and fruit

Remember, consistency is key.  It is important it is good to eat a well-balanced diet full of fruits, vegetables, grains, healthy fats, and proteins to prevent deterioration of the muscles.

Tawnie Goodwin

Sources:  

American Dietetic Association. (2009, January 1). Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada and the American College of Sports Medicine from the Academy: Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://www.eatright.org/About/Content.aspx?id=8365

Blatner, D. (2012, December 1). Play Ball! Tips for the Weekend Baseball Warrior. from the Academy. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://www.eatright.org/Public/content.aspx?id=6442463944

Mayo Clinic. (2014, February 12). Dehydration. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dehydration/basics/symptoms/con-20030056

Quinn, E. (2014, January 1). How Much Water Should You Drink Proper Hydration During Exercise?. About.com Sports Medicine. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/hydrationandfluid/a/ProperHydration.htm

Cucumber Mint Milkshake

Cucumber Mint Milkshake

 

This is one of my new favorite things.  The recipe is low in carbs and high in nutrients, protein, and flavor.  It is super easy to make.  Throw it together and blend.

Recipe:

1 cup ice

2 mint leaves

1/4 large cucumber

1 cup spinach

1 scoop vanilla whey protein

1 cup 30 calorie almond milk or skim milk–the whey protein adds substance

1 squeeze of a lemon (about 1/2 to 1 tsp)

1/4 T ground cinnamon (velvet finish)

1/8 tsp ground ginger

1 packet truvia or a stevia leaf (optional)

Your going to love it!

Tawnie Goodwin

 

LOOK AT WHAT I GOT TO DO!

Good PostureSwan Dive

Yesterday I went to the Miss Collinsville Scholarship Pageant to help with the Rising Star Program (young girls mentored by women in the system.)  The girls got to take their picture with the then current Miss Collinsville, Clara Gregory, and make frames for them.  Somewhere along the way we had a moment to stretch for good posture and to use our hands to measure healthy amounts of food.

Tawnie Goodwin

Happy Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving on the Amazon
Thanksgiving on the Amazon

One year ago today I was in Brazil on the Amazon River enjoying Thanksgiving dinner with friends from the ship.  I tried to send the picture above to my family however, wifi was a bit restricted.  As much as I enjoyed myself I cannot be happier to be with my family today.  I have so much to be thankful for!!!  This is a very limited list of my favorite things.

1.  Family and friends

2.  Health and the health and well-being of my family

3. Opportunity to pursue a degree in dietetics

4.  My job (including but not limited to my relationships at work)

5.  America (freedom and protection)

6.  Semester at Sea experience (this made me a better person)

7.  Miss Oklahoma Organizations and local pageant directors

8.  My partnership with the American Diabetes Association  (great opportunity to promote health education)

From my family to yours, Happy Thanksgiving!

Tawnie Goodwin

Focus on Slow Carbohydrates

I received a question earlier this week asking how to satisfied hunger while cutting calories.  I thought I would address the major contributors to hunger and follow up with suggestions to slow its return.  I want to stress that being hungry is good because it signifies that our metabolism (energy burning system) is working.  This post focuses on the role carbohydrates play in satiety.

It is a good idea to focus on carbohydrates (carbs) that are released into the bloodstream slowly.  These are called complex carbs.

The DL on Carbohydrates.  Carbs are the bodies quickest source of energy.  The stomach breaks down complex carbs into glucose, the simplest carb.  Glucose is then released into the bloodstream and transported throughout the body.  More complex carbs take longer for the stomach to break down because they have to be converted or broken down into glucose.  These complex carbs are introduced to the bloodstream in slower increments.  This is the reason we feel immediate energy when we consume foods that are processed (highly broken down carbs) like ice cream, white bread, and candy.

Solution:  Eat Slow Carbs.  This is where common sense comes into play.  Generally, the less processed a food, the longer it takes the stomach to break that food down.  Try making the switch from white to whole grain bread.  A grain of wheat is made up of a germ, an endosperm, and the bran.  White bread only contains the endosperm and is lacking in fiber and other nutrients derived from the germ and bran.  Below is a list of slow digesting carbohydrates:

Green Vegetables, Brown Bread (the best is whole grain), Oatmeal, Bran Cereal, All Beans and Legumes

Solution: Fill up with Fiber.  Fiber does not digest but is very useful to the diet.  Eating a slow carb diet and high fiber diet go hand and hand because fiber slows digestion.  The average woman should eat around 25 grams of fiber/ day.  The average man should consume 38 grams / day.  (http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2002/Dietary-Reference-Intakes-for-Energy-Carbohydrate-Fiber-Fat-Fatty-Acids-Cholesterol-Protein-and-Amino-Acids.aspx)

Fiber is contained in the skins of fruits and vegetables.  Don’t peel your organic potatoes!  Other high fiber foods are bran, vegetables, legumes, and fruits (apples and pears contain a lot of fiber.)

Solution:  Portion sizes.  When food is digested in large quantities and quickly it leaves the body with an energy overload–too many calories in the system.  This causes the body to store the remaining energy as fat.  Note that carbs are not the enemy, they are simply the poison of choice for many individuals when food is consumed in excess.  Fat and protein are also stored as fat when eaten in quantities too large for the body to burn at one point in time.  Consuming carbohydrates in smaller amounts can help stabilize blood sugar levels and combat fat storage.

One portion size of grains is about the size of your clenched fist.  Remember, most every food contains carbs with the exception of meat.

Hope this helps,

Tawnie Goodwin