Sports Nutrition Part 3: Fuel Up

Consuming meals properly and within the appropriate time frame can decrease workout recovery time and increase muscle growth.  This post explores pre and post workout meals.

Pre Exercise.  For the casual exerciser, keep your diet practical.  I suggest eating a square meal about 4 hours before your workout.  Avoid meals that are high in fat (whole dairy products, nuts, and fried or processed foods) and fiber (fiber bars, beans, and legumes).  Exercisers should also avoid foods that are not typical to their diets as the body may not digest them well.  The goal is to keep the digestive system moving quickly to avoid gastrointestinal stress.  The ability to break down food quickly is important to nutrient absorption.

About 30 minutes before physical activity, carbs should be eaten for quick energy.  It is best if the carbs are fast digesting.  Most fruit will fall under this category.

Post Exercise.  Refueling the body is vital to the recovery process.  After exercise, your body’s cells soak up the nutrients like a sponges.  Post exercise meals should be consumed in a 4:1 ratio of carbohydrates to protein.  Don’t worry!  I made it easy for you.  Below, I listed a few snacks that fit this mold.  Meals should be consumed within 30 minutes after your workout.

1/2 whole wheat bread peanut butter sandwich

1 – 80z  glass of low-fat milk (endurance athletes drink low-fat chocolate milk)

Smoothie with low-fat milk and fruit

Remember, consistency is key.  It is important it is good to eat a well-balanced diet full of fruits, vegetables, grains, healthy fats, and proteins to prevent deterioration of the muscles.

Tawnie Goodwin

Sources:  

American Dietetic Association. (2009, January 1). Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada and the American College of Sports Medicine from the Academy: Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://www.eatright.org/About/Content.aspx?id=8365

Blatner, D. (2012, December 1). Play Ball! Tips for the Weekend Baseball Warrior. from the Academy. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://www.eatright.org/Public/content.aspx?id=6442463944

Mayo Clinic. (2014, February 12). Dehydration. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dehydration/basics/symptoms/con-20030056

Quinn, E. (2014, January 1). How Much Water Should You Drink Proper Hydration During Exercise?. About.com Sports Medicine. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/hydrationandfluid/a/ProperHydration.htm

My Food Wizards Graduated!

The amazing students at Maryetta Elementary School graduated last week after being inducted into The Food Wizard’s Club (https://nutritionbytawnie.com/2014/04/04/food-wizards-club/).  The below picture is one of four graduating classes.  I am so proud of them all!

Food Wizards

Sports Nutrition Part 2: The Hydration Game Plan

Those who do more, need more.  As stated in Sports Nutrition Part 1, aggressive climate, lengthy duration, and heightened intensity during exercise cause greater amounts of sweat loss.  These are important factors to consider when planning to hydrate for physical activity.  This post is my “Hydration Game Plan” for before, during, and after exercise.  Before I lay out the hydration blueprint, let’s have a short Q & A session.

Sports drinks or water?  Contrary to popular belief, the drink of champions may just be water.  During exercise, athletes partaking in a minimum of 60 minutes of physical activity are the only ones who need to replenish their *carbohydrate and electrolyte stores.  Therefore, children and adults do not need sugar-fueled sports drinks or juices if they are participating in less than 60 minutes of exercise.

What about endurance athletes?  If an athlete is vigorously exercising for 60 minutes, or moderately active for more than 90 minutes, sports drinks of 6-8% carbohydrates are crucial for the body to function optimally.

Can I drink too much water?  There is such a thing as drinking too much water.  The condition is called hyponatremia but may be more commonly recognized as waterlogged.  Too much water can leave a person feeling sluggish or disoriented.  People in this state should seek immediate medical attention.  Shoot for the guidelines in the chart below to ensure you are well, but not over hydrated.

What are electrolytes and do I need them?  Examples of electrolytes found in the body are sodium and potassium.  They help the body maintain a healthy fluid balance.  Refueling is not as important for the average gym goer because sodium and potassium are minerals which are found naturally in the foods we eat daily.  Unless a person is participating in 3-5 hours of exercise such as marathon runners or Ironman competitors they should be able to get the nutrients needed from a balanced diet.

Do I need to eat before or after my workout?  The answer is both.  Look for pre- and post-exercise meals in Sports Nutrition Part 3.

*Carbohydrates (fruits, grains, legumes, and most non-green vegetables) are the bodies primary source of fuel, stored in the muscles and liver.  Essentially, carbs are the human version of gasoline to a car.  

The Hydration Game Plan

Before Exercise
2-3 hours before                                                                                   15-20 oz of water
10-15 minutes before                                                                            8-10 oz of water
During Physical Activity
Less than 60 to 90 minutes of activity                                        8-10 oz of water every 10-15 minutes
Endurance athletes                                                                                8-10 oz of a sports drink every 15-30 minutes
After Training
*20-24 oz of water for every pound of body weight lost.

*In order to know how much water to consume after a race, weight should be taken before and after exercise to properly compensate for sweat losses.

Drink up!

Tawnie Goodwin

 

Sources:  

American Dietetic Association. (2009, January 1). Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada and the American College of Sports Medicine from the Academy: Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://www.eatright.org/About/Content.aspx?id=8365

Blatner, D. (2012, December 1). Play Ball! Tips for the Weekend Baseball Warrior. from the Academy. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://www.eatright.org/Public/content.aspx?id=6442463944

Mayo Clinic. (2014, February 12). Dehydration. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dehydration/basics/symptoms/con-20030056

Quinn, E. (2014, January 1). How Much Water Should You Drink Proper Hydration During Exercise?. About.com Sports Medicine. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/hydrationandfluid/a/ProperHydration.htm

Living With Diabetes

I am honored to be the master of ceremonies for the American Diabetes Association’s Living with Diabetes health and wellness fair this coming Saturday.  Come get a free screening and learn more about diabetes prevention and maintenance.  The link below is an informational flyer.  For more information about diabetes visit http://www.diabetes.org.

Living With Diabetes Flyer

Enjoy your day!

Tawnie Goodwin

 

Sports Nutrition Part 1: The Rules of Hydration

Sports nutrition, just like general nutrition, must be planned to meet individual needs.  However, there are a few general rules of proper hydration and fueling that a person can follow to improve his or her performance and health.  My first post about sports nutrition will address “The Rules of Hydration.”

Rule #1  Hydrate before, during, and after physical activity.  Proper hydration for exercise begins far before the activity takes place.  Additionally, water replacement should continue during and after physical activity.  I will address the logistics of hydration timing in a second post.

Rule #2  Pay attention to climate.  Heat, humidity, and altitude play largely into the amount of water your body needs to function.  Thus, it is easier to deplete your system in more intense environments.  Also take into consideration that well trained athletes sweat more.  Therefore, those who are in better shape need more water to replace an increased amount of sweat loss.

Rule #3  Don’t wait until you are thirsty to hydrate.  According to the Mayo Clinic, symptoms of dehydration include dry mouth, sleepiness, thirst, decreased urine output, dry skin, headache, constipation, and dizziness.  Keep in mind however, dehydration can occur before symptoms appear.

Rule #4  Take into account the duration and intensity of the exercise.  Those who exercise more intensely such as sports athletes and endurance runners go through their water, carbohydrate, and electrolyte stores more quickly.

Remember, hydration is not only important for exercise, but also for daily activities.

Tawnie Goodwin

 

Sources:  

American Dietetic Association. (2009, January 1). Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada and the American College of Sports Medicine from the Academy: Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://www.eatright.org/About/Content.aspx?id=8365

Blatner, D. (2012, December 1). Play Ball! Tips for the Weekend Baseball Warrior. from the Academy. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://www.eatright.org/Public/content.aspx?id=6442463944

Mayo Clinic. (2014, February 12). Dehydration. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dehydration/basics/symptoms/con-20030056

Quinn, E. (2014, January 1). How Much Water Should You Drink Proper Hydration During Exercise?. About.com Sports Medicine. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/hydrationandfluid/a/ProperHydration.htm

 

Diabetes Risk Test

Take the Diabetes Risk Test to see if you are at risk for type 2 diabetes.  Risk factors include, but are not limited to your family background and your age.  The test is free and it is super easy.  For every person who takes the test before April 25th, Boar’s Head Brand will donate $5 to the American Diabetes Association.  Go to http://www.diabetes.org/risktest.

Wishing you good health!

Tawnie Goodwin